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Everyone's brain

is wireddifferently

DT Roadshow
Wellington 19 & 20 Nov
DT Roadshow
Christchurch 5 & 6 Nov
Auckland 12 & 13 Nov
The Neurosdiversity Movement is coming to you this November!
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Welcome to DivergenThinking

Neurodiversity has been called the ‘next frontier’ in organisational change and business development. That is certainly true. It’s also something very personal, impacting the lives of individuals and families throughout the world at every level and in every circumstance.

At DivergenThinking, we GET IT. We live it every day. We’re here to help you GET IT, work with you while you’re GETTING IT and celebrate your success when you’ve GOT IT.

We know the challenges, opportunities and wonderful possibilities an engaged neurodiverse population can bring. The evidence is well documented and irrefutable.

The world is discovering that neurodiverse people are simply wired differently to those perceived more ‘normal’ or ‘neurotypical’. It has nothing to do with being ‘flawed’ or having a ‘disorder’. It’s about recognising and utilising the value in different ways of thinking.

  • The world is discovering that neurodiverse people are simply wired differently to those perceived more ‘normal’ or ‘neurotypical’. Being neurodiverse has nothing to do with being ‘flawed’ or having a ‘deficit’ or ‘disorder’. It’s about recognising strengths, maximising the value in different ways of thinking, and appreciating every single person in the universe for who they are and what they bring, so they are seen, heard, and valued and therefore belong. This is the best Mental Health & Wellbeing any individual, community and country can wish for.

Neurodiversity really is a beautiful thing. Strong neurodiverse traits are common in the great minds that have, and always will, shape our world.

DivergenThinking are neurodiversity experts and leaders of the neurodiversity movement. We want to support individuals and leaders in education, organisations, not for profit and government agencies to:

1. Recognise different brain wirings i.e., neurodiversity, as the strengths they are

2. Realise the value and huge opportunities different brain wirings bring to society including a large population of untapped talent

3. Understand the Mental Health & Wellbeing impacts that being ignored creates for the untapped population who are excluded from society

4. Build ‘true’ psychologically safe environments where individuals are empowered to be their authentic selves and are therefore able do their best work

a. This is the best Mental Health & Wellbeing we can give our people and

b. will build engaged, productive, innovative organisations and societies

We work with individuals, communities, schools, organisations, not for profits and government agencies to:

1. Build awareness of the value of different thinking

2. Develop an understanding of the impacts of not valuing individuals because of their different thinking and behaviours

3. Deliver education on the value of different thinking and the mental health and wellbeing this creates

4. Challenge ignorance and negative perceptions on different thinking

5. Support the journey towards a ‘truly’ neurodiverse inclusive society

Understand
neurodiversity

Understand
neurodiversity

Innovation
& productivity

Innovation
& productivity

Neurodiversity
education

Neurodiversity
education

Community

Community

Albert Einstein

Albert Einstein is hailed as one of the greatest thinkers of the 20th century – Einstein’s general theory of relativity changed the way people viewed the universe. Einstein excelled in visual imagination and spacial reasoning. Although it is unproven, there is plenty of evidence to suggest he displayed dyslexic traits or top right traits. He also famously had problems with spelling and grammar and experienced delayed speech, not speaking comfortably until he was 6 years old.

Albert Einstein

is hailed as one of the greatest thinkers of the 20th century – Einstein’s general theory of relativity changed the way people viewed the universe. Einstein excelled in visual imagination and spacial reasoning. Although it is unproven, there is plenty of evidence to suggest he displayed dyslexic traits or top right traits. He also famously had problems with spelling and grammar and experienced delayed speech, not speaking comfortably until he was 6 years old.

Nikola Tesla

Nikola Tesla This celebrated inventor and engineer is finally getting the credit he deserves for discovering and patenting the rotating magnetic field, the basis of most alternating-current machinery and the three-phase system of electric power transmission. He displayed top left autistic and top right dyslexic strengths along with bottom left challenges. He was said to have struggled with a number of phobias and OCD with an obsession with the number three. He was also said to have bottom right traits of sensory processing being extremely sensitive to light and sound, isolating himself to cope. Sadly he died poor and alone.

Nikola Tesla

This celebrated inventor and engineer is finally getting the credit he deserves for discovering and patenting the rotating magnetic field, the basis of most alternating-current machinery and the three-phase system of electric power transmission. He displayed top left autistic and top right dyslexic strengths along with bottom left challenges. He was said to have struggled with a number of phobias and OCD with an obsession with the number three. He was also said to have bottom right traits of sensory processing being extremely sensitive to light and sound, isolating himself to cope. Sadly he died poor and alone.

Charles Darwin B

Charles Darwin Trinity College professor Michael Fitzgerald, a leading psychiatrist, researched and published a paper concluding that Charles Darwin had Asperger’s Syndrome - also known as autism. There are records from Darwin’s childhood that state he was a very quiet child who avoided interaction with others as much as he could and preferred to isolate. Like so many others with Asperger’s, he sought alternative ways of communicating, such as writing letters. He displayed autistic traits such as fixation or - as we at DivergenThinking would say, a thirst for knowledge about all things - relating to chemistry. This is a top left brain wiring. He was also a very visual thinker which is often associated with dyslexia and top right thinking.

Charles Darwin

Trinity College professor Michael Fitzgerald, a leading psychiatrist, researched and published a paper concluding that Charles Darwin had Asperger’s Syndrome - also known as autism. There are records from Darwin’s childhood that state he was a very quiet child who avoided interaction with others as much as he could and preferred to isolate. Like so many others with Asperger’s, he sought alternative ways of communicating, such as writing letters. He displayed autistic traits such as fixation or - as we at DivergenThinking would say, a thirst for knowledge about all things - relating to chemistry. This is a top left brain wiring. He was also a very visual thinker which is often associated with dyslexia and top right thinking.

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